Project Restore Implementation In Phases

Phase VI

Spring- Summer 2017 
To improve environmental conditions adjacent to the Old Railroad Grade, one of the most popular routes on Mt. Tamalpais, Marin Municipal Water District is continuing Project Restore late this Spring on the south side of Mt. Tamalpais, between East Ridgecrest Boulevard and Panoramic Highway. Unofficial trails in this area have been proliferating over the years, confusing hikers, providing corridors for weed migration and adding sediment to the creeks, impacting water quality and fisheries habitat or traversing the watershed in a wholly non-sustainable manner.

In 2009, Project Restore, now in its sixth year, was launched to restore natural habitats and improve visitor safety. In past years, trails have been removed, habitat restored and trail signage and connectivity improved in the Bon Tempe Lake area, the Temelpa Trail area on East Peak, in the Kent Trail – High Marsh area and on West Peak.

The main objectives of this year’s work will be to:

  • Decommission 1.7 miles of non-system trails through habitat restoration areas;
  • Better define trailhead wayfinding for official trail routes on the south side of Mt. Tamalpais;
  • Repair roadside habitat along Railroad Grade and Gravity Car Road; and
  • Minimize erosion.
Undesirable roads and trails will be decommissioned and their footprints restored to natural habitat. This year, the Project Restore work conducted by MMWD staff will be supported by One Tam - a five agency partnership to care for the greater Mt. Tamalpais ecosystem and through the efforts of corpsmembers from Conservation Corps North Bay, a local youth development and conservation organization.

A special One Tam sponsored volunteer event will be held on Saturday May 6,(9am-2pm) to engage volunteers with stewardship of damaged roadside areas along Gravity Car Road and at Double Bow Knot. Participants are invited to join the many hikers, cyclists, and equestrians expected for this event.

 


   
A flyer and map of phase VI implementation is available online.

Map of Phase VI Project Areas (click to enlarge)

20170406 Project Restore VI - Whole Area

Phase V

- 2014


Was located in the vicinity of Bon Tempe and Lagunitas lakes. Undesirable and redundant roads and trails were decommissioned - their footprints restored to natural habitat, and the official trails were made more sustainable. The main objectives of the phase V work were to:
  • Remove trails through sensitive habitats
  • Better define the official routes with signage and markers
  • Remove invasive plants and enhance the native vegetation with a “climate smart” re-vegetation program

The re-vegetation was a joint project between MMWD and STRAW (Students and Teachers Restoring a Watershed), a program of Point Blue Conservation Science. STRAW brings together teachers, students, restoration specialists, and other community members, such as MMWD, to help restore and enhance watersheds. Funding for this collaboration between MMWD and STRAW comes from the North Bay Watershed Association and the Marin Chapter of the California Native Plant Society
 
A flyer and map of the phase V implementation is available online.

Phase IV

- 2012
Concentrated on an area near the top of Lagunitas - Rock Spring Road near the West Peak of Mt. Tamalpais. Unofficial trails in this area have been proliferating over the years and some pass through sensitive habitats of serpentine rock. The main objectives of the phase IV work were to:
  • Decommission non - system trails in and around sensitive habitats
  • Better define the system routes through the old air force station on West Peak
  • Minimize erosion
A flyer and map of the phase IV implementation is available online.

Phase III

- 2011
Took place in the Kent Trail – High Marsh area on the north side of Mt. Tamalpais.Unofficial trails in this area are notorious for misleading hikers resulting in many of the district’s search and rescue efforts. The main objectives of the phase III work were to:
  • Better define the system routes to help people from getting lost
  • Decommission redundant, confusing trails
  • Minimize the impact of the trail system on natural resources when practicable
A flyer and map of the phase III implementation is available online.

Phase II

- 2010
Several shortcuts in the upper Temelpa Trail were closed and signed to keep people from furthering erosion in this very steep area on the East Peak of Mt. Tamalpais, and another half mile of steep, eroding trail was decommissioned below Rifle Camp picnic area while other routes in the vicinity were improved and signed to maintain trail connectivity and clarity.

Phase I

- 2009
Nearly one mile of unofficial trails were decommissioned in the Bon Tempe Lake area. Crews physically removed unofficial trails by restoring soil profiles and encouraging natural revegetation.